Medicine Balls

Here is a healthy treat that can incorporate a medicinal dose of herbs at a fraction of the cost of your pills or tinctures. It’s easy to forget medicines that are kept in the fridge but I tend to find the opposite problem in this case!

These medicine balls are a great mid morning or afternoon pick me up.

Note: There are many herbs that can be dangerous in this dose range of this recipe and many more that will interact with medications. Always consult your medical or naturopathic doctor to determine which herbs are safe for you at what dose.

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Ingredients: 

  • 4 Tbsp dried, powdered herbs*

  • ½ Tbsp spirulina or cocoa powder

  • 1 cup nut butter (I recommend organic sunflower, almond, cashew or hazelnut)

  • 3 tablespoons of ground nuts

    • I often recommend walnut, pumpkinseeds or sesame, depending on patient needs

  • ⅓ cup maple syrup or ½ cup honey

    • for extra sweetness, add 1 tsp stevia powder

  • 4 Tbsp shredded coconut for rolling

    • Optional rolling add-ons: ½ tbsp of cocoa and/or erythritol 

Instructions: 

  1. In a medium bowl, mix nut butter and liquid (honey/maple syrup/water).

  2. In a second bowl stir herbs and ground nuts/seeds. qTurn on your favourite show, your fingers are about to get sticky!

  3. Add the herbs to the liquid and mix until you have relatively uniform paste, similar to cookie dough. It is ok if the texture is softer than you would like: they will firm up in the fridge.

  4. Roll the paste into ⅔ - ¾ inch diameter balls.

  5. Roll the balls in unsweetened coconut flakes and/or powdered erythritol/cocoa.

  6. Store any balls that will not be eaten within the week in the freezer where they will keep for up to 3 months. This week’s rations can be kept in the fridge. 

Applesauce Oatmeal Breakfast Cookies

Full of nuts, seeds and oats, these are hearty cookies.  With all of the protein, fiber and healthy fats, these cookies will keep you full and energized throughout the morning. Customize this recipe with your favourite nuts, seeds and dried fruits.  While regular applesauce will work, the key to the rich flavour of these cookies is using roasted applesauce, the recipe for which can be found here.

Dry ingredients:

1 cup rolled oats* or quinoa flakes

1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 

½ cup brown sugar or sweetener of choice*

⅓  cup ground flaxseeds*

½  teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon sea salt

1 tsp cinnamon

¾ tsp nutmeg

 

Wet ingredients: 

⅓ cup butter or coconut oil

1 ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce 

¼ cup sunflower butter (or other nut butter)

½  teaspoon vanilla

 

Crunchy and sweet options: 

- ⅓ cup raisins, dried cranberries or any chopped dried fruit  

- ½ cup chopped walnuts, pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds 

- you could add ¼ cup cacao nibs or chocolate chips 

Notes: 

*Use certified gluten-free oats if you require this recipe to be gluten-free

What you eat for breakfast sets the tone for your blood sugar regulation throughout the rest of the day. For a lower carb breakfast version, I suggest you omit the sugar or replace with an equal amount of erythritol and/or 1 tsp stevia

Storing ground flaxseeds in the fridge or freezer prevents the delicate oils from becoming rancid

 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F

2. In a medium bowl, mix together oat flakes, coconuts flour, flaxseeds, sugar, baking soda, salt and spices

3. In another bowl, mix butter/oil, applesauce, sunflower butter and vanilla

4. Mix dry and wet ingredients together, then add any additional nuts/seeds/dried fruits

5. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper/silicon baking mat (or oil the pans). Scoop dough onto the prepared baking sheets (2-3 Tbsp is a reasonable size)

6. Bake for 15 minutes or until cookies are browning, top and bottom

7. Allow cookies to cool on the pan and transfer to an airtight container

9. If you don’t intend to devour these within 3 days, I suggest that you freeze them 

 

 

In gluten freevegan Tags snowy mtn farm food

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Roasted Applesauce

February 6, 2017 Sapphire Vanderlip

 

Roasted applesauce is a culinary hidden gem.  The more common way to make applesauce is to boil the apples.  But roasting the apples with a little oil imbues the applesauce with a rich caramel flavour.  Roasted applesauce is wonderful on its own, or a great addition to muffin, cake, cookie and pancake recipes, bringing in just the right amount of sweetness and moisture.


Apples are a nutritional powerhouse.  I keep the skin on my apples not because I'm too lazy to peel them, but because apple skins contain a wealth of health promoting compounds and fiber.  The antioxidants in apples prevent cell and tissue damage by free radicals, helping to prevent various cancers and diabetes.  They are also antiviral and anti-inflammatory.  Happily, cooking apples do not seem to reduce most of the beneficial effects of apples.  So baked applesauce is a unique and tasty way to get all of the health benefits of apples.

 

Unfortunately, apples topped the Environmental Working Group's list of most pesticide contaminated fruits and veggies for 5 years in a row, until Strawberries overcame them in 2016. So, if you are looking to reduce your and our planet's exposure to pesticides, choosing to buy organic apples will make a big impact. 

Ingredients:

5 pounds of chopped & cored apples

1 Tbsp of honey/maple syrup (optional)

1 tsp sea salt or himalayan salt

2 Tbsp unsalted butter or coconut oil

1 tsp apple cider vinegar (optional)

 

Instructions:

1. Preheat your oven to 375° F

2. Slice apples into a large baking dish and quickly mix in honey, salt and butter/oil

3. Cover the pan and bake until soft, 20-25 minutes

4. Remove apples from the oven and raise the heat to 500°F

5. Return apples to the oven, uncovered.  Roast for 10 minutes, when the apples should begin brown around the edges

6. Let the apples cool and blend until smooth 

7. Can or keep for up to one week in the fridge 

 

Notes: 

You may choose to add an inch of fresh ginger or 2 tsp of cinnamon just before blending, although some of the caramel flavour may be hidden in the process

 

Roasted Applesauce

Roasted applesauce is a culinary hidden gem.   While it is usually made by boiling the apples, roasting the apples with a touch of oil imbues the applesauce with a rich caramel flavour. Roasted applesauce is wonderful on its own, or a great addition to muffin, cake, cookie and pancake recipes, bringing in just the right amount of sweetness and moisture.


Apples are a nutritional powerhouse.  I keep the skin on my apples not because I'm too lazy to peel them, but because apple skins contain a wealth of health promoting compounds and fiber.  The antioxidants in apples prevent cell and tissue damage by free radicals, helping to prevent various cancers and diabetes.  They are also antiviral and anti-inflammatory.  Happily, cooking apples do not seem to reduce most of the beneficial effects of apples.  So baked applesauce is a unique and tasty way to get all of the health benefits of apples.

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Unfortunately, apples topped the Environmental Working Group's list of most pesticide contaminated fruits and veggies for 5 years in a row, until Strawberries overcame them in 2016. So, if you are looking to reduce your and our planet's exposure to pesticides, choosing to buy organic apples will make a big impact. 

Ingredients:

5 pounds of chopped & cored apples

1 Tbsp of honey/maple syrup (optional)

1 tsp sea salt or himalayan salt

2 Tbsp unsalted butter or coconut oil

1 tsp apple cider vinegar (optional)

 

Instructions:

1. Preheat your oven to 375° F

2. Slice apples into a large baking dish and quickly mix in honey, salt and butter/oil

3. Cover the pan and bake until soft, 20-25 minutes

4. Remove apples from the oven and raise the heat to 500°F

5. Return apples to the oven, uncovered.  Roast for 10 minutes, when the apples should begin brown around the edges

6. Let the apples cool and blend until smooth 

7. Can or keep for up to one week in the fridge 

 

Notes: 

You may choose to add an inch of fresh ginger or 2 tsp of cinnamon just before blending, although some of the caramel flavour may be hidden in the process